Archive for the ‘Tejano’ Category

Guest Post: High-C from Rehash Media

Thursday, August 23rd, 2012

Back again on Música del Alma is the dude High-C, joining us on a whirlwind promotional stint in honor of his freshly redesigned mega-blog, Rehash Excavation. Along with partner in grime Wilson, High-C has been generously sharing quality soul and funk music on his website for well over a decade. Today, he provides us with some killer Tejano Soul courtesy of Tony Hernandez!  -Slim Jenkins

Tony Hernandez and the Latin Liners: “Jo Tex” & “Nothing is the Same”
From the La Voz Encantadora LP  (Capri Records – Dallas, Texas)

Hailing from Seguin, Texas, just 35 miles east of San Antonio, emerges one of Chicano music’s less heralded bandleaders, Tony Hernandez. Like other comparable Mexican American bands of the day, Tony and his Latin Liners boasted an eclectic repertoire, delving into multiple genres, playing everything from traditional Mexican rancheras and boleros to up-tempo, chugging funk instrumentals. Following suit behind the A-listers on the scene such as Sunny & the Sunliners and Little Joe and the Latinaires, Tony spared no expense on the horn section’s payroll. This barrage of fortified brass is what defined the Texas Sound in the 1960s-70s and is what makes the featured tune so undeniably heavy. An homage to a fellow Texan soul brother, “Jo Tex [sic]” is one of two funky offerings on an LP composed almost entirely of rancheras. The second point of interest (to funk fans, anyway) on “La Voz…” is the band’s take on the 1970 Grand Funk tune “Nothing is the Same.” The familiar drum, bass and guitar intro that inspired sampling hip hoppers over twenty years ago sounds even sweeter given the Latin treatment. – High-C

EDIT:

Thanks to Detective Jenkins for mining deep into the Youtube-o-sphere to uncover that “Jo Tex” is not an original TH & tLL composition, but in fact, a cover of a cover:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dTnG2duZ_rk

and

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o3XCRtEsBx4

Check out High-C’s previous Guest Post for Música del Alma. Un abrazo, compadre!

 

Guest Post: LA CUMBIA TEJANA

Monday, December 19th, 2011

Alex LaRotta is a good friend and emerging ethnomusicologist based in San Antonio, Texas.  This week he has written an outstanding overview about the incorporation of Cumbia into the Tex-Mex gamut.  Thanks, man!

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What’s often misunderstood about La Onda Chicana – the Tex-Mex musical/socio-political movement of the early 1970s – is that the ‘new sound’ emanating from Texas didn’t just incorporate American r&b and rock music, as it is popularly understood.  Tex-Mex orquestas associated with La Onda Chicana also incorporated música tropical of Caribbean and South American influence, though to a discernible lesser degree than Latin groups in New York and Chicago. The Colombian cumbia became wildly popular in Mexico by the early 1960s in part by Eduardo Baptista and his Mexico City-based musical powerhouse, Discos Peerless – one of the oldest and most influential Latin American record labels of the 20th century. As late as the mid ’60s, Peerless and its various subsidiary labels were licensing, pressing, and distributing Colombian cumbias across Central American and into the American Southwest, feeding the infectious cumbia frenzy on both sides of the border. Meanwhile, tropical groups started popping up across Mexico, emulating the great cumbia and tropical bandleaders of Colombia – Pacho Galan and Lucho Bermúdez were particularly popular figures of Mexico’s tropical scene. Though the craze wasn’t as profitable as the mambo or cha-cha-cha of several years prior, cumbia has enjoyed an arguably longer shelf life than many other of the ‘trendy’ Latin musical styles. Later re-imagined by Selena and her early ’90s pop crossover sensation, cumbia remains a genre favorite for Tejano bands even today. Needless to say, the synth-heavy and all-too-’80s sound of the modern cumbia tejana is a far stretch from its Colombian Afro-Caribbean roots, but these early Texas cumbias were remarkably pretty close to the big band sounds of Colombia’s golden age. Most Texas cumbias were covers of Colombian and Mexican hits, so while there weren’t tropical arrangers in Texas per se, Tex-mex bands of La Onda era were definitely bit by the cumbia bug.

Subtle changes to band arrangements and instrumentation can be found in La Onda records of the late ’60s/early ’70s, which had evolved from the basic bass-and-accordion conjunto instrumentation known throughout most of South Texas to big brass bands and full-bodied orquestas. Considering that both the Colombian cumbia and Tex-Mex conjunto are characteristically accordion-driven musical styles, the genre melding during La Onda heyday sounds quite natural, though notably distinct than the original Colombian compositions.

All history/ramblings aside, big up to Adam and Música del Alma for inviting me to share a few of my favorite cumbia tejana sides. Gracias compadre! Enjoy!

Sunny and The Sunliners – “La Pollera Colorada” & “Cissy Strut” from The Missing Link LP (Key-Loc, 1970)

Though Sunny and The Sunliners’ The Missing Link LP is well-known in latin funk circles (and it does get super fonky – check their rendition of The Meters’ “Cissy Strut” below for the non-believers), this record contains one of my all-time favorite cumbia covers. Sunny takes a swing at the immortal cumbia classic – “La Pollera Color·” – written by Colombian costeÒo Wilson Choperena of Pedro Salcedo y su Orquesta fame. Though no one could ever really top Choperena’s original, Sunny’s version easily qualifies for honorable mention. Wilson Chopenera recently passed on (a week ago as of this writing), but his legacy lives on with this timeless Colombian anthem and countless other compositions. R.I.P. maestro.

Little Joe and The Latinaires – “Cumbia de la Media Noche” from the Arriba! LP – (Buena Suerte, 1968)

From José ”Little Joe” Hernandez’s Arriba! LP – the debut full-length of his Buena Suerte imprint (of legendary Brothers Seven fame for the funk heads) – “Cumbia de la Media Noche” is a personal favorite. The huge (huuuge!) horns and luscious, bright keys alone gives it my Colombian stamp of approval – trust me, used only sparingly. “Cumbia de la Media Noche” was a popular cover tune of early Mexican tropical groups, recorded and popularized by Mexico’s Carmen Rivero y Su Conjunto in 1964. To my knowledge, Little Joe was the first Tejano to take a crack at it.

Lalo Garciano y Su Orquesta – “Poquita Fe b/w Alegria” (El Zarape, 196?)

A relative unknown of the Tex-Mex music world (aka ungoogleable), Lalo Garciano y Su Orquesta’s “Alegria” (a typo from the real title of the song, “Alergia”, and coincidentally my Mom’s name – HI MOM!), “Alegria” is a big horn cumbia produced by Mr. Onda Chicana himself – Johnny Gonzales of the Dallas-based El Zarape Records.* Originally recorded in 1968 by popular Mexican tropical group Sonora Santanera for CBS Mexico, Garciano and his group faithfully execute a near note-to-note cover of Chico Navarro’s original. Gotta love that big bellowing “CUMBIA!” that kicks off at the top!

NEW MIX: “Dame El Rock”

Thursday, April 15th, 2010
Today I offer you all a short but sweet mix of Latin treats from all over the western hemisphere; from the Bay Area of California to El Salvador to Uruguay!

The first mix that I’ve done for my own site (I know, I know), Dame El Rock is the first installment in what will surely be a continuing series that seeks to expose some of Latin America’s forgotten rock hard gems.  At times funky, psychedelic and soulful, this collection of tracks starts off heavy, but soon mellows out until finally culminating in one of my favorite songs of all time: Cofradia‘s rare “Tu Carino”!

dame_el_rock_final

— Dame El Rock —

Los Rodyn’s: “Cafe” (El Salvador)
Ray Camacho: “Damelo” (California)
People: “Picadillo” (Texas)
Via Libre: “Tiuba La Quieba” (El Salvador)
Challenger’s: “Emily” (Puerto Rico)
La Logia Sarabanda: “Cajon De Castanas” (Peru)
Los Zheros: “Cuarto Oscuro” (Peru)
Totem: “Caspita” (Uruguay)
Rulie Garcia: “Earthquake” (California)
Los Orientales: “La Danza Del Mono” (Peru by way of Colombia)
Cofradia: “Tu Carino” (Panama)

Chicano Power

Friday, September 11th, 2009

Otherwise filled to the brim with popular Rancheras and cheesy Baladas, the Chicano Power LP by Little Joe and the Embers contains one notable exception.  Check out their hard and heavy version of the Santana classic “Oye Como Va”, itself an adaption of an earlier Tito Puente song.  The lead guitarist must have been fully feeling the Chicano Power because he gives Santana himself a run for his money on pure skill!

Little Joe and the Embers: “Oye Como Va”
From the Chicano Power LP (NorTex, 1973)

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Guest Post: High-C from Rehash Media

Friday, August 21st, 2009

Our next guest post comes from Texas-based DJ High-C, co-creator (with Wilson) of the amazing Rehash Media website that features record reviews and mixes.  It has been a staple of mine for years, so it is a big pleasure to have C drop the Tejano fuego here at Musica del Alma!

-Slim

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Just when you think you’re well-versed on Tejano Funk, something like this pops up. I was familiar with the Dallas Capri label but had never heard of Neto. After scanning the track listing in hopes of finding some English song titles, I quickly realized that I had hit the Tejano soul jackpot. A cover of Bobby Patterson’s “TCB or TYA” AND a cover of Juggy Murray’s “Oily?” I knew I had to own this record before I’d even heard it. Call it filed at first sight. And fortunately for me, upon giving it an initial spin my suspicions were confirmed. This record esta chingon! I even bump the rancheras on the regular. RIP Neto! Your funky legacy lives on!

- High-C

Neto Perez: “TCB or TYA” & “Oily”
From his In Memory of Neto Perez LP (Capri, 196/7?)
neto